Right in the centre - When reality sets in

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

The federal government is cutting a special carbon tax deal with New Brunswick. Seems that a coke-fired electrical plant in that province will be exempt from almost all the new carbon tax, because it will be closed in a few years. This is the kind of “Pretzel Policy” governments bring in when faced with economic and political reality. I don’t think there is a hope that coal-fired or coke-fired plants will be eliminated by 2030, or whenever.

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My perspective - Fighting the resistance

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson

Neepawa Banner & Press

Sometimes it’s easy to forget, but the livestock sector doesn’t operate in a vacuum.  Producers were reminded of that late last year, when new regulations came into effect regarding the purchase of antimicrobials, commonly known as antibiotics.

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Right in the centre - Will election overload allow the important issues to emerge?

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

We Manitobans are in for a lot of electioneering over the next 12-18 months. We just got through the municipal elections, which saw major changes in many towns and RMs. It was almost inevitable that the day would come in some communities when a number of younger people would come out and get elected. It happened in many communities.

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My perspective - Bridging the digital divide

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson

Neepawa Banner & Press

Our future is connected, but Canadians outside urban centres are already being left behind. Rural residents know a thing or two about poor cell service, but the problem is even worse when it comes to rural broadband. Despite a 2016 promise to close the digital divide that separates those with access to cheap and plentiful broadband internet from those without, the Trudeau government has done little to make this a reality.

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Right in the centre - Learning from the past, looking to the future

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

Iam told, or more precisely, I have read that Canada’s first public pension plan was introduced in 1927, with the passing of the Old Age Pensions Act. That legislation established a means-tested pension for men and women 70 years of age and over, who had little or no income. I remember hearing about “means tests” in my younger days, but I really don’t know when Old Age pensions became unconditional.

Read more: Right in the centre - Learning from the past, looking to the future